Posts tagged Social Spellwork
Unicorn Anti-Hate Hex

This year has been such a departure from the norm for me, I’ll usually take January to rest up after the Holiday market season, but this year chose to plow through a deadline to submit images on the 1st of January, spending my birthday on the 31st of December working. Then there were literally mountains of books on folk art and folk magic so sift through - searching for nuggets of inspirational material to work from this Spring. The Liminal art show put on by Conspiracy of Strange Girls in mid-January, Huldufolk art show in March (which, if you hadn’t heard, was marred by the presence of crypto-fascists and was shut down for the disturbance). Last in a run of gallery shows was the Unicorn Art Show in April, and a series of 3 Hex signs modeled after a Pennsylvania Dutch barn art tradition. In contrast to the original unicorn hex for piety, these Anti-Hate Hexes were made in response to the events at Huldufolk (which was held in the same space as the Unicorn Art Show), as an antidote to the damage done to the community.

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Charms for Claytopia

A sigil is a symbol used in magick. The term comes from the Latin word ‘to sign’ and has historically referred to a type of pictorial seal to invoke an angel, demon (commonly understood as an elemental or psychological force) or other supernatural entity in western occultism. Sigils were made popular in the ‘80s and ‘90’s within the context of Chaos Magick and refer to a symbolic representation of the magician's desired outcome. I like to expand this definition to include many other instances where magical intentions have been embedded in different facets of folk culture. Examples can include designs that have been woven into textiles or built into homes for protection, charms forged into tools for potency, movement in dance and in many other places, some now forgotten and some well preserved.

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Symbols Tell Stories

This is the beginning of a participatory art project, using community-sourced symbols to create a visual language that tells of our relationship to local ecology. Folk art is derivative of direct experience with the landscape. Specific adaptations to local environments give rise to unique forms of creative expression, born out of necessity. The oldest known form of magic, pictographs were used to appeal to nature in an effort to obtain some form of control. In the current era, however, it is nature that requires our healing and protection through re-enchanting our relationship with her.

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Magical Midwest Folk Art Tour

This photo essay is from a Summer road trip around the lower half of Lake Michigan. Mostly in search of the beach, I'll be honest, but also as a scouting mission to find out what folk art presents itself along the way. My mind has been filtering for living traditions, hidden in plain sight. Decorative marks form visual languages, speaking to our relationship with the landscape, telling of the ways we are beholden to and in love with creation. Traumatized by our collective past, we've stopped making folk art like we used to, stopped celebrating nature due to a psychic disconnection from it - as though we have been shot into space. Disoriented, we can start bringing ourselves back down to Earth, grounding through interaction with our local ecologies and healing community by observing ancestral art forms. This is an exploration of current stories being actively translated into new symbolic expressions.

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